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20130318
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. this has been done by two graphical market. >> how much are you talking about without involving government run spectrum? each tv station runs on six megahertz. it is possible for them to share three megahertz apiece. if you add up those six or those trees, it creates a lot to get to that 60 that folks want in chicago, manhattan, or l.a.. then you find that broadcasters would have to give up their -- >> would government run spectrum be part of this auction process? about a government ,un free, wireless run network there was no basis to that. folks were confusing and inflating the idea of unlicensed spectrum. i have been a proponent of loa unlicensed use of unused tv channels in certain markets. they are sort of scrap spectrum, if you will. it is ideal for low powered devices. i am a little skeptical of a nationwide 30 megahertz. that is a big chunk of spectrum. use,haracteristic of that you need large transmitters when you're speaking about the chunks of spectrum. you're talking about harmful transitions i can go a long distance. that means a lot of electricity behind it and the towers. --
talking about without involving government-run spectrum? >> guest: so we'll drill down on your question there in a minute, want to know more about what you're thinking there. so each tv station runs traditionally on six megahertz. it's possible for them to channel share three megahertz apiece. so if you add up those six or those threes, it takes a lot to free up enough spectrum to get to that 60 that folks want in manhattan or chicago or l.a. so can you find, let's say, 10, 15 broadcasters or maybe more in the new york market to give up their spectrum or to share with others depending on how you want to use your math to get there? so what did you mean by the government-run spectrum? >> host: well, will government-run spectrum be part of this auction process? >> guest: there were some stories was it late last year, todd, about whether or not there'd be some nationwide, government-run, free wireless broadband network? maybe it was earlier this year, actually. >> earlier this year, yeah. >> guest: and there was just no basis to that. folks were confusing and conflating the idea of unlicens
involving government run spectrum? >> we'll get to the spectrum and the question in a minute when we know what you are thinking there, so each tv station and it's poll to share 3 megahertz a piece. add up the six or three, it takes a lot to free up the spectrum to get to the 60 that was hoped for in chicago, manhattan, or l.a.. can you find, let's say 10, 15 # broadcasters or maybe more in the new york market to give up their spectrum, particularly to share with others? depending on how you use the math. what do you mean by "government run spectrum"? >> host: will government run spectrum will a part of the process? >> guest: late last year, there was a story about some nationwide government run, free wireless broadband network, maybe earlier this year, actually, that story was printed, and there was just no basis to that. i think people were confusing and conflating the idea of unlicensed spectrum. i've been a proponent of unlicensed uses of what we call the td white spaces, the unused tv channels in certain markets, and they are scratch spectrum if you will, and it's more ideal for low p
today. they're being attacked pretty aggressively by some folks in government today. >> host: well, there's a corporation in rochester, new york, called vuzix. what are we looking at? >> guest: this is calls the m-100, and what it is is, basically, accessory for your cellular phone or smartphone. it enhances your smartphone experience. so it has an onboard processer, so you can run apps on there by itself, and it runs through android. however, when it really, the real power there is the synergy between the device and your smartphone. so you can do something like this, for instance. controlling your smartphone through this, and you would see this on the top screen up here. >> host: this is just a regular app. >> guest: right. this is just a regular app. >> host: great. >> guest: so you can down hold it from our -- download it from our web site, vuzix.com. so to overlay things in the real world, and, you know, basically what we call information snacking is sort of our tag line there. other things just sort of a hands-free device to get phone calls, up pops, you know, whoever's callin
are some of the regulatory issues. they are being attacked aggressively by some of our folks in government today. >> host: there's a corp. in rochester new york called -- that is developed award-winning technology. adam travers with this. what are we looking at? >> this is called a m100 what it is, it's basically an accessory for your cellular or smart phone. it enhances your smartphone experience. it has an onboard processors you can run apps on there by itself and it runs through andrade however the real power there is the synergy between the device and your smart gun. you can do something like this for instance. controlling your smartphone through this and you would see this on the top screen appear. this is just a regular app so you can download it from our web site and there are other things you can do it. it has the elton chambers or you can do augmented reality applications. overlay on the real world and basically what we call information standing our tagline there. other things is a hand free device to get phonecalls at top. whoever's calling, the phone number you can take a caller
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5